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Invictus_Antagonistes

New PC needed, looking to build one.

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Hey all,

So I've not been able to play WoWs since mid-December when my old rig decided to crap out on me, rather than repair it (nearly 5 years old) I thought I would build a new one; and that is a challenge for me as I've never built one. So I've gone to Newegg and picked out some parts etc, I mostly play this and a few MMO games; nothing fancy or ultra high-end. I need some advice as to the parts and anything I should look out for during the build, is it hard and what drivers would need to be installed once the build is complete.

In no order other than what's on my wish list here are the parts I want.

  • Seagate BarraCuda ST1000DM010 1TB 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Hard Drive Bare Drive
  • AMD RYZEN 5 2400G Quad-Core 3.6 GHz (3.9 GHz Turbo) Socket AM4 65W YD2400C5FBBOX Desktop Processor            
  • DIYPC IllusionII-BR Black Dual USB3.0 Steel / Tempered Glass ATX Mid Tower Gaming Computer Case w/4 x 120mm Red 33LED Light Fans (Pre-Installed)            
  • MSI A320M Gaming PRO AM4 AMD A320 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.1 HDMI Micro ATX AMD Motherboard
  • RAIDMAX HYBRID 2 RX-630SS 630W ATX12V V2.2/ EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready Modular Power Supply, New Version with Build-in LED Fan On/Off Switch
  • Team Elite Plus 4GB 288-Pin DDR4 SDRAM DDR4 2400 (PC4 19200) Desktop Memory Model TPRD44G2400HC1601
  • HP S700 2.5" 250GB SATA III 3D NAND Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) 2DP98AA#ABC
  • Sapphire PULSE Radeon RX 560 4GB GDDR5 PCI-E HDMI / DVI-D / DP OC Version (UEFI)

 

That list comes to about £490, I could maybe squeeze my budget to £550 but thoughts? Suggestions and remember go easy on this newbie, my beard has sensitive feelings.

 

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Don't go cheap on your PSU. Look for a quality component instead. It is the one component that is connected to all the others with the important duty to always provide the right amount of power. If the PSU fails it could take all other components with it.

For your budget I'd go with this one: https://www.newegg.com/global/uk/Product/Product.aspx?item=N82E16817151202 (slightly higher price but a very good manufacturer known for quality products (7 year warranty)). You don't actually need 600+ watts for your system, so you can also chose to go for a lower output version to safe a few bucks.

 

Try to get at least twice as much RAM into your system. 4 GB isn't enough anymore. 8 GB should be the bare minimum by todays standards. 16 is preferable to future proof your system but maybe a bit to expensive for your budget.

 

 

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Thanks for the tips there, I should have added I'm looking at getting 2x 8GB ram sticks. My old machine had 8gb so now I fancy an upgrade; having just gone back over the post I realised I've listed the wrong RAM.

Cheers.

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40 minutes ago, Egoleter said:

Don't go cheap on your PSU. Look for a quality component instead. It is the one component that is connected to all the others with the important duty to always provide the right amount of power. If the PSU fails it could take all other components with it.

For your budget I'd go with this one: https://www.newegg.com/global/uk/Product/Product.aspx?item=N82E16817151202 (slightly higher price but a very good manufacturer known for quality products (7 year warranty)). You don't actually need 600+ watts for your system, so you can also chose to go for a lower output version to safe a few bucks.

 

Try to get at least twice as much RAM into your system. 4 GB isn't enough anymore. 8 GB should be the bare minimum by todays standards. 16 is preferable to future proof your system but maybe a bit to expensive for your budget.

 

 

This. This! THIS!!!

 

Seasonic makes very good PSU and 7 years warranty is neat. You can also check out Corsair which are also of pretty high quality (a good chunk of their PSU's are build by Seasonic) and afaik come with 10 years warranty. EVGA also makes solid PSU, also comes with 10 years warranty afaik.

 

At the very least you want an efficiency rating of Bronze (80+% efficiency rating at typical power draw levels), but if you can score a good price for a higher efficiency rating, go for it. You can skimp a bit on wattage if you want to keep the costs low since your system shouldn't draw more than 500W (if even that, more like 400W, but it's good to have a bit headroom) even under full load. Only go for a higher wattage PSU if you absolutely, positively know that you're going to use the same PSU in a later upgraded build that will need more power. Nothing hurts me more than seeing a system that draws 500W at the most strapped to a 1000W PSU because people were told "moar powah".

 

 

I'd also recommend going for 8GB RAM at least. RAM is pretty expensive these days though, so it's going to hurt your wallent. On another note, you optimally want two RAM modules, not one. The CPU you listed communicates with RAM via dual-channel, which means with two RAM modules you double your memory bandwidth (for example 2x4GB would result in a more responsive system than 1x8GB in a dual-channel system).

 

 

Do note that your processor already comes with an integrated GPU (roughly equivalent to a GT 1030 or RX 550 in performance (also dependant on your memory configuration though)).

 

 

 

edit://

Sweet Jesus you just made me scour my usual tech outlets looking for prices for half an hour ...

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36 minutes ago, Aotearas said:

This. This! THIS!!!

 

Seasonic makes very good PSU and 7 years warranty is neat. You can also check out Corsair which are also of pretty high quality (a good chunk of their PSU's are build by Seasonic) and afaik come with 10 years warranty. EVGA also makes solid PSU, also comes with 10 years warranty afaik.

 

At the very least you want an efficiency rating of Bronze (80+% efficiency rating at typical power draw levels), but if you can score a good price for a higher efficiency rating, go for it. You can skimp a bit on wattage if you want to keep the costs low since your system shouldn't draw more than 500W (if even that, more like 400W, but it's good to have a bit headroom) even under full load. Only go for a higher wattage PSU if you absolutely, positively know that you're going to use the same PSU in a later upgraded build that will need more power. Nothing hurts me more than seeing a system that draws 500W at the most strapped to a 1000W PSU because people were told "moar powah".

To add to what Ao wrote there:

- Seasonic also offers 10 year warranty on their PSUs. Just not at that price range. Didn't look at the other two if it could apply to them. If you spend a few pound more, then Seasonic will also offer 10 year warranties (but I didn't see any like this in the below 700 watt region during my quick check earlier).

- As far as efficiency for the PSU goes, I have to agree on at least a bronze certificate. The one I listed is gold certified. The better the certificate the less power is wasted in converting the power from your plug to the needs of your system components.

- The best performance to efficiency rating of a PSU is usually reached at about 50 % of it's rated power. It drops significantly below 20 % and above 80 % usage (numbers can vary by model and brand). So if your system is normally only using 80 watts, but your system comes with a 1000 watt PSU you are wasting power and therefore money. So unless you plan to upgrade significantly later on, only buy the smallest necessary PSU. More power only means more wasted money. (One of the reasons I listed a PSU that also comes in a 450 (recommended) and a 550 watt version).

 

I wish you great success in your first self build PC.

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Voltage selection switch of that CrapMaxx tells its design is garbage.

Active-PFC which automatically handles different mains voltage has been standard for 15 years in any semi-OK quality PSU.

Doubt its actually reliably anything more than 300-400W PSU.

Or at least certainly not for long time, capacitors are certain to be cheap Chinese excrement.

 

25 minutes ago, Egoleter said:

For your budget I'd go with this one: https://www.newegg.com/global/uk/Product/Product.aspx?item=N82E16817151202 (slightly higher price but a very good manufacturer known for quality products (7 year warranty)). You don't actually need 600+ watts for your system, so you can also chose to go for a lower output version to safe a few bucks.

550W is well enough for mid level and well chosen above mid level graphics cards.

 

And RX560 is 100W level power consumption card, meaning max gaming load is likely around 200W.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-radeon-rx-560-4gb,5254-14.html

So even quality 450W PSU would be plenty if tight on budget and knowing to stay on budget graphics cards also in future

https://www.newegg.com/global/uk/Product/Product.aspx?item=N82E16817151204


 

 

42 minutes ago, Invictus_Antagonistes said:

Thanks for the tips there, I should have added I'm looking at getting 2x 8GB ram sticks. My old machine had 8gb so now I fancy an upgrade; having just gone back over the post I realised I've listed the wrong RAM.

Cheers.

16GB memory actually helps notably with overall loading times of games from HDD.

While for example Warships is very frugal in its memory use Windows uses excess memory to cache last accessed files.

 

So while initial/first time load is HDD slow, after that loading times improve when previously used game asset files are found from that cache.

(and only files of new map/ships need to be read from HDD)

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18 minutes ago, EsaTuunanen said:

So even quality 450W PSU would be plenty if tight on budget and knowing to stay on budget graphics cards also in future

If you look at my second post (which was posted at the same time as your reply) you'll see that I agree with your assessment of necessary PSU output.

It's rare to see a potential PC build thread were no one comes in to recommend a more powerfull PSU then needed for god knows what reason. :cap_like:

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I really follow and suck PC parts information only when I build a rig. Thus I haven't really kept up with PC parts news since last summer and can't help with CPUs, but still I'd change that 1TB Seagate Barracuda to same sized one from WD's Blue series. My second HDD is a 1TB Barracuda and it still works, but those 1TB Barracudas don't really enjoy good reputation.

 


 

Not directed at OP as these PSU's are a bit too expensive for his budget, but overall;

 

When it comes to PSUs, from Corsair I'd recommend RMx or higher. I have RM650x and it came with a 10 year warranty. RMi series is pretty much same as RMx, but with Fluid Dynamic Bearing fan instead of rifle bearing + the Corsair Link for digital monitoring of the PSU. Seasonic also has 10 year warranties on FOCUS+ series and 12 years on PRIME series. (I would have originally ordered a PRIME series PSU from Mindfactory but it was out of stock then.)

 

 

Anyways, as said, get a good PSU to avoid harm and frustration ^^

 

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28 minutes ago, Aotearas said:

You can also check out Corsair which are also of pretty high quality

Let's revise that: Corsair isn't any automatic quality brand.

Two or three more affordable price Corsair PSU lines are standard average PSUs with cheap Chinese parts.

And those with quality parts have clear Corsair tax in price over what quality component Seasonics cost nowadays.

 

 

22 minutes ago, Egoleter said:

- Seasonic also offers 10 year warranty on their PSUs. Just not at that price range. Didn't look at the other two if it could apply to them. If you spend a few pound more, then Seasonic will also offer 10 year warranties (but I didn't see any like this in the below 700 watt region during my quick check earlier).

- As far as efficiency for the PSU goes, I have to agree on at least a bronze certificate.

Standard full modular Focus Plus has 10 year warranty.

https://www.newegg.com/global/uk/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151189

 

Anyway Focus models have same insides and difference is always needed motherboard power cables being fixed.

Antec Earthwatts Gold Pro is another semi-modular rebranding of Focus Plus.

 

80+ Bronze PSUs are so medieval that wouldn't recommend them for active use PC.

While difference in electricity bill isn't big, people living in warm countries likely want to minimize additional room heating.

And besides efficiency also their design is outdated doing worser voltage regulation under different loads.

Also extra cost is miniscule considering quality PSU's life time.

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1 hour ago, Egoleter said:

Don't go cheap on your PSU. Look for a quality component instead. It is the one component that is connected to all the others with the important duty to always provide the right amount of power. If the PSU fails it could take all other components with it.

 

34 minutes ago, Egoleter said:

- The best performance to efficiency rating of a PSU is usually reached at about 50 % of it's rated power. It drops significantly below 20 % and above 80 % usage (numbers can vary by model and brand). So if your system is normally only using 80 watts, but your system comes with a 1000 watt PSU you are wasting power and therefore money. So unless you plan to upgrade significantly later on, only buy the smallest necessary PSU. More power only means more wasted money. (One of the reasons I listed a PSU that also comes in a 450 (recommended) and a 550 watt version).

Yes, a good PSU is the basis for everything else. And an UPS if possible. I've burnt a couple of PCs during my lifetime because of not having the proper power supply protection: a Pentium 3 whose only salvageable component was the FDD and a LGA 775 that lost the motherboard and ODDs. I was able to reconstruct the latter with a second-hand motherboard to find out that the CPU had suffered a big chunk in its performance (about 25% slower than originally) but could still be employed as a benchmark for customers' components. And yes, unless planning to upgrade later on (I do it a lot), which is something you can't do too much anyway with an uATX, avoid unnecessary extra power.

 

1 hour ago, Invictus_Antagonistes said:

Thanks for the tips there, I should have added I'm looking at getting 2x 8GB ram sticks. My old machine had 8gb so now I fancy an upgrade; having just gone back over the post I realised I've listed the wrong RAM.

Cheers.

 

54 minutes ago, EsaTuunanen said:

16GB memory actually helps notably with overall loading times of games from HDD.

While for example Warships is very frugal in its memory use Windows uses excess memory to cache last accessed files.

 

So while initial/first time load is HDD slow, after that loading times improve when previously used game asset files are found from that cache.

(and only files of new map/ships need to be read from HDD)

This can be considered a bit outdated by now, but one of the many rules of thumb in the late '90s/early 2000s was having at least four times the GPU RAM for the CPU. So if going for a 4GB graphics card you'll need those 16GB on the motherboard. Pay attention, though, to the fact that GPUs are designed with specific RAM requirements, thus being a waste of money buying a card with more memory than the quantity its processor is meant for (that's one of the favourite "the more the better" noob traps from manufacturers). Also the extra RAM helps in being a cache for already accessed files, as EsaTuunanen pointed out.

 

I doubt this last tips will make a difference, but Windows, at least in my experience, is an extremely jealous OS: it has to be installed in the very first drive and doesn't like not being in control of the MBR/GPT. Which means that, for ensuring the best performance, the SSD should have the OS and be attached to the first SATA port. Apart from that, and because of it's nature, better move the pagefile to the HDD or disable it altogether.

 

Salute.

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If it has to be Newegg, the following PSUs from their assortment are recommendable (according to the accumulated wisdom of the German PC hardware techie community, which has a reputation to be really "hardcore" regarding PSUs) :

 

- Seasonic Focus Plus

- Cooler Master G550M

- Cooler Master V550

- EVGA SuperNova G3

 

If you are planning to use a discrete GPU anyway, why do you want to use the 2400G? It has no more CPU power than the the regular R5 1400, but a higher price and more hardware compatibility issues (for example mainboards needing an BIOS update - something you should talk about with your hardware vendor before buying) as of yet.

 

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On 4/1/2018 at 5:52 PM, OldIronsides said:

- Cooler Master G550M

That GxxxM serie has medieval 80+ Bronze efficiency and cheap capacitors.

Second tier Teapos would be upgrade from its CapXon/JunFu mix.

Or what ever Chinese lottery grab bag stuff they're using nowadays now that no one wants to review those models.

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also i would spend those 10 bucks more and take a b350 motherboard, you can oc the processor and have higher speed ram, that will help you A LOT ( up to 30-40% in some application and 1% lows fps) with a ryzen processor.

I cannot stress enought what they said above, ALWAYS buy a good psu, the new evga b3 for their price are a steal, very good ripple, good effciency ( are rated bronze but in tests are more in the silver ballparck), modular and semipassive fan.

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On 4/5/2018 at 11:50 AM, Flavio1997 said:

ALWAYS buy a good psu, the new evga b3 for their price are a steal, very good ripple, good effciency ( are rated bronze but in tests are more in the silver ballparck), modular and semipassive fan.

Good PSUs protect themselves from overload...

 

We noticed that the over-power protection triggering point is set way too high. Even under normal operating temperatures, one of the primary FETs in our store-bought sample, along with some other components, blew up. Either SF should set its OPP point much lower or use components able to handle higher amperage. We were also disturbed by the fact that, after the primary side shorted out, the PSU's fuse didn't blow. Every time we applied power, we saw sparks. Obviously, that's a fire hazard.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/evga-450-b3-psu,5160-11.html

 

We weren't able to run all of our protection feature tests because the 750 B3 refused to start after our OPP evaluation. This is exactly what happened with the 850 B3. Although the over-power protection feature's triggering point is fairly normal (close to 120%), it seems to have caused a permanent malfunction, even at modest ambient temperatures.

Given that this is the third B3-series PSU in a row to to die on us under similar conditions, EVGA and Super Flower need to take immediate action.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/evga-750-b3-power-supply,5229-6.html

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