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Did_Eye_Hurt_You

How do you celebrate halloween in your country

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With halloween  fast approaching us, how does your country celebrate?

In England I have found that long gone has the tradition of trying to grab an apple from a bowl using your mouth, the side stalls selling mulled wine, all we get now is kids knocking on your saying trick or treat,

I guess if you asked them show me a trick they wouldnt have a clue, in most towns flour and eggs are banned to under 18's,

Anyway not to put a dampner on the night, tell us in your country how do you celebrate the night.

halloween.jpg

HAPPY HALLOWEEN EVERYONE HAVE A GREAT NIGHT ON TUESDAY EVENING AND HAVE FUN

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Alpha Tester, In AlfaTesters
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In Denmark we also don't celebrate halloween. Sure the shops put out costumes and advertises for it and so on trying to ofcourse milk it for all it is worth, but I have never seen a party (beyond drinking party at the university or dorms) or anyone actually going out trick or treating. We have fastelavn which lies in the spring, where some kids go out asking for candy.

 

Hell, I don't even know how many people in Europe actually celebrate it, seems more like an American thing to me.

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Beta Tester
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There are no "real" celebration in France either.

Tradition in France was, as others who celebrate it, for young kids to go round houses ask for candies, and nothing else. But I have to admit it's rarer and rarer. Nowadays the number of kids who actually do it is extremely low.
It's fading away. Not that I'm complaining, I don't like Halloween. 

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Players
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In Hungary, it's basically the same as above. I did not see, nor even heard of actual trick or treating, most I have seen are basically "casus belli for getting drunk" Halloween-parties, where people could dress up as some "random-random thing, but the sexy variant" and go to the pub. ...not much of those either, actually.

Almost the biggest impact it seems to have is in the social media, where the 'Hallloween is awesome' vs. 'Halloween is an american shyte, we celebrate All Hallows Eve around here" arguments attack each other again and again each year over and over to no end, even though they are on different days. But advertisements and companies didn't really hook themselves into this just yet, although I guess once supply will flood the market, demand will follow and it will become gradually more "hip".

 

Meanwhile the actual national tradition of dressing up and getting drunk is dying, along with the rest of the original traditions. However, it seems like a natural process.

Probably as societies are getting more fragmented, lifestyles changed, the traditional village structures getting older and basically extinct (and frankly, having better things to do), classic holidays will cease to exist or they will be revamped in a very "consumer-friendly" manner by the industry.

 

...but hey, if the state would create a non-working day by law in the spirit of Halloween, I'd all about pumpkins.

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Beta Tester
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In the Netherlands me and a few friends actually tried to organise some Halloween-ing... It was fun, but alot of kids showed up saying: "hi! Where are the treats? What do you mean we need a costume? Just because it was in the brochure doesnt mean it is required right???" Then they showed up later with their parents complaining that it was unfair. Which meant that WE had to explain why kids without costumes were getting Sweet to the kids WITH costumes... :Smile_sceptic:

 

Like above, its a bit of a marketing strategy here, and a few party-ish disco things etc.

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[IRQ]
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In Sweden we basically don't. There are some who's gotten into the American tradition of running around in costumes and collecting candy, but they're not particularly many. And there are always people looking for an excuse to party.

 

Now, All Saints' Day, on the other hand, we do celebrate by visiting graves and lighting candles.

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