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StringWitch

Downward sloping of carrier decks at the back?

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[BABBY]
Beta Tester
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The upward 'ski jump' slopes are easy to find questions and answers about, but what is the purpose of the downward aft sloping that appears on possibly every carrier ever built to this day?

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[DEFR]
[DEFR]
Players
1,242 posts

I would imagine because of aircraft coming in at the back of the ship to land, so having a slope going downwards would make it safer I guess if the planes misjudge a bit while doing the landing aiming for the higher part of the deck, if they are a little too low that downwards slope gives them some leeway to still be able to land safety

 

Dunno, makes you wonder also if it might be done to help remove water off the deck with a sloping back end, that water will run off it as the ships moves forward and ship momentum makes water on the deck flow towards the back part of the ship

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[SCRUB]
Players
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13,036 battles

Sloped armour provides more effective armour thickness. So if a drunken pilot yeets his aircraft too low on approach into the CV, it deals less damage to the ship. [/joke]

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Players
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18,185 battles

It was an idea the British came up with they thought it would help pilots landing that's why it's so pronounced on the Ark Royal. However it was found to be pointless being that pronounced as no pilot would try to land that close to the stern and also it meant fewer planes could be kept on deck so reducing the carrier group. So although they keep the slop it's far less than it used to be. 

 

As for why its still kept im not totally sure I have read ideas about the way it affects air turbulence. 

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