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The_Wallet_Warrior

Any Network geeks that can help?

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Doing a lot of data dumps onto the networked NAS and I am capping out at 10.8 MB/s but the network (and cabling) is for Gigabit so shouldn't that be 100 to 125 MB/s?

 

NAS is 1 gigabit,

PC network card is 1 gigabit,

Modem NAS is connected to is 10 gigabit,

Cabling is CAT 6.

 

Where is the bottle neck here and how do I fix it, I can't spend 30 minutes transferring each file when it should be done in 3 minutes. 

 

Any and all help is appreciated.

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Not much of a networking tech, but my first guess would be the harddrives on the NAS bottlenecking due to having much slower read/write speeds than what the network could theoretically send around.

 

 

For context, drive writing speeds are benchmarked in three basic categories:

  • Sequential (i.e.: very large files) which is the fastest (those are the ones that manufacuters brag with high numbers)
  • 512k (normal sized files, the one you encounter most of the time on average workloads such as documents, smaller audio files, etc. pp.)
  • 4K (smallest file size, typically OS ressources for example) which are the most workload intensive for drives to fetch.

 

What files are you transferring anyway? If it's stuff like lots of music MP3s or text documents (which I would suppose considering that's what people tend to store/shuffle on a NAS) then ~10MB/s would sound a bit on the low end for an average 7200rpm harddrive (say if they're already at capacity). You could attempt to clean the drives with disk management software and get rid of accumulated trash data. Otherwise not much you could do to improve that other than making the switch to SSDs in the NAS (if you got money to blow or don't need massive storage capacity).

 

If that's not the case, then I'm out of my depth though.

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It's a common mistake to think that your full bandwidth (1Gbps is your theoretical limit since that's the transfer rate for your less capable device) is used for transferring the "meaningful" data. There's a lot of extra bits being sent and received (frame, packet and segment headers, flow control and rate limit signals, etc.) in order to ensure that the real data arrives correctly, and the more the latter is fragmented (i.e., small files) the more negotiation has to be done. Not to mention other network status checks (ARP, DHCP... because machines are now hardly ever configured manually) and connections/sessions that are active at the same time, because I doubt that you're idling and doing nothing but the file transfer from your PC to the NAS and it's also highly doubtful that background processes aren't making some calls home.

 

As for possible internalities at both ends, Aotearas has already mentioned the read/write speed for HDDs (either in the NAS or in the PC) which shouldn't be too much of a problem unless they suffer from heavy fragmentation or you're putting an extra workload on them at the same time. But considering to what degree people, myself included, neglect it I shouldn't be surprised in the slightest.

 

Salute.

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I think you two are right on the issue of the HDDs in the NAS, it hasn’t had disk defragmentation since 2014 so I guess when I get into work tomorrow morning I’ll start that off.

 

Oh and I am transferring 4K footage and rendered sequences from Adobe Premiere

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16 minutes ago, The_Wallet_Warrior said:

I think you two are right on the issue of the HDDs in the NAS, it hasn’t had disk defragmentation since 2014 so I guess when I get into work tomorrow morning I’ll start that off.

 

Oh and I am transferring 4K footage and rendered sequences from Adobe Premiere

 

Cluttered HDD would be an explanation, especially since 4K footage and other such large files enjoy the fastest read/write speeds.

 

Would be hella cluttered with trash data though to drop down as low as ~10MB/s because even now dated 5400 rpm HDDs should easily eclipse that kind of performance with sequential reads/writes unless they were really crap hardware to begin with. Probably a bit worse than just cluttered data so I would highly recommend checking the drives for stuff like bad sectors or other defects.

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11 hours ago, Aotearas said:

 

Cluttered HDD would be an explanation, especially since 4K footage and other such large files enjoy the fastest read/write speeds.

 

Would be hella cluttered with trash data though to drop down as low as ~10MB/s because even now dated 5400 rpm HDDs should easily eclipse that kind of performance with sequential reads/writes unless they were really crap hardware to begin with. Probably a bit worse than just cluttered data so I would highly recommend checking the drives for stuff like bad sectors or other defects.

Mate, my company buys the cheapest trash they can as long as it makes the minimum specifications. 

 

I was doing 3D AutoCAD renders on Nvidia 9400GT until recently when they allowed me to get a GTX 1060! 

 

Anyway I had to stop transferring now anyway because I have other issues now - see my new thread :Smile-angry:

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