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  1. Last night I did a quick login, to see what my daily missions were, and I was mildly shocked, but not completely surprised to see that the amount of active players was a hair below 12K (NA server). So I went to the vbAddict site to look up some statistics on the weekly averages. I chose the weekly increments, giving me a fairly fine scale to work with, while cancelling out weekly fluctuations like a busy weekend versus a calm Tuesday afternoon. What I saw there was very disturbing. The playernumbers across all four servers are gliding at a fairly constant speed towards zero. Sure, there are small increases as well (especially when new content is added), but they do not outweigh the steady decline. Since vbAddict doesn't allow me to combine all the four servers into one graph, I did it myself in Excel, with the values they gave me. And this is the result: As you can see, the game is clearly ill, which may have various reasons, but I think it can be safely boiled down to these things: Known flaws, errors and broken stuff that did not get fixed in a timely fashion. If something is broken, it ain't no use to continue playing with it, so people will pack up their stuff and leave. You can clearly see that even in CBT, the playerbase was declining, with occasional rises when new waves of players were invited. Players did, and do, leave when they notice that no real progress has been made. The aimbot-gate, and the lack of thorough, direct and prioritized attention from Wargaming sure didn't help with it. Players read the internet, if they see that there are issues in-game (via forums, gamesites,...), they will draw their conclusions, and leave. Don't forget: "reputation comes by foot, and goes by horse". While the absolute number of players is steadily increasing, the number of active players is decreasing. That means that many players see this game, make an account, play a few games, and then move of. Since they made an account, that means that they have an interest in the game, but they are being turned away by other reasons. My guess: the flaws, the lack of WG-interaction, specials,... The "public release", which was not marketed and announced as it should, completely failed to make a noticable impact, and failed in doing what it's sole purpose was: launching the game, and attracting new players, to further increase the playerbase. There was a small increase, but not enough the counter the decrease that happened in OBT. Where the addition of new content makes for a small increment in active players, it does not outweigh the steady decline (caused mainly by the flaws that there are in-game). The good does not outweigh the bad. The total lack of incentive of binding players to the game has a profound impact. The selling of premium time and doubloons bundled with premium ships has failed into luring the players enough into spending a continuous time in-game. While it may be profitable for Wargaming in terms of monetary value, it also has succeeded into poisoning the playerbase. TL: DR: the bundles are too expensive for attracting new players, the main buyers of the bundles are players who are already in the game. New players aren't particularly interested in a ship AND doubloons AND premium AND flags AND... From a player perspective, it's safe to say the bundles have totally failed. From a monetary perspective probably not, but there is no way that WG will be able to continue with those bundles. While the NA-server gets hammered with freebees, giveaways, contests, big prizepools,... this does not correspond in an increase in players. Even more staggering: they are one of the smallest servers in the WOWS-universe, even the SEA has caught up with them. Yet they consume virtually all the promotional budget from Wargaming. There is no way that the American players, with their numbers, are spending more money than the EU players. Solutions MAKE SPECIALS NOTEWORTHY AND INTERESTING! There is no way you're going to keep players happy and interested in your game, when the only thing you can come up with is an "X2" for experience for the first battle. There is already an abundance in experience. This clearly reflects in the graphs, that weeks in which specials are held have a significant higher number of players than weeks in which no specials were held. What would make a special noteworthy, and attract players? Discounts on port-slots, discounts on ships (premium & techtree), personal missions & in-game rewards. FIX YOUR GAME BEFORE ADDING NEW CONTENT! First make the basis healthy and working properly, then add stuff to it. Without a healthy base, the game will tumble and collapse. WHEN NEW CONTENT IS ADDED: TEST IT BEFORE RELEASE! Many of the (gamebreaking) flaws could have been prevented by thoroughly testing the new patch, and a proper collection of the feedback and data. Many of the in-game flaws aren't new, and were already being discussed in an elaborate way. Yet somehow patch after patch gets spewed out without proper testing, after which much time is lost with fixing stuff that could and should have been fixed before, especially since it was known. A broken patch scares away players. It's better to delay a patch for a couple of weeks, and make sure it works, than to throw it in the public, and fix the problems as they address themselves. PROMOTE YOUR $H1T! When the basic fixing is done, promote your game by attracting new players, and you can attract them mainly via 1). MIGRATE RESOURCES FROM THE NA TO THE EU AND SEA: pretty obvious, it seems.
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