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Found 38 results

  1. DefconGTX

    USS Alaska

    Die USS Alaska (historischer Hintergrund) geht in den Supertest, wobei sie zunächst als Kreuzer auf Tier IX eingeordnet wird. Vorläufige Daten laut dem World of Warships Development Blog:
  2. Liaholana

    Helena

    Hier bitte alles zur Helena rein.
  3. Liaholana

    Seattle

    Hier bitte alles zur Seattle rein.
  4. Liaholana

    Dallas

    Hier bitte alles bezüglich der Dallas rein.
  5. Liaholana

    Buffalo

    Hier bitte eure Erfahrungen zur Buffalo Tier IX Kreuzer der USA. Vorschau
  6. Liaholana

    Cleveland - T-VIII

    Hier bitte alles bezüglich der Cleveland - TVIII Kreuzer der USA rein. Vorschau
  7. Liaholana

    Worcester

    Thread zur Worcester Tier X Kreuzer der USA Vorschau
  8. SgtWinterer

    Missouri

    Missouri BB-63 Premium Schlachtschiff Tier 9 Grunddaten (gleich mit Iowa): Hauptbatterie: 3x3 16in Sekundärbatterie: 10x2 6in DP Geschwindigkeit: 32kn Tonnage: 57.500ts Unterschiede zur Iowa (Historisch): - Unterschiedliche Enfernungsmesser - 40mm statt 20mm Flak auf B-Turm
  9. Maracher

    Boise

    Wir stellen die Nueve de Julio bzw Boise ausführlich vor. -Geschichte -Werte im Vergleich zur Helena und Abruzzi -Verbesserungen + Verbrauchsmaterial -sinnvolle Signale + Tarnungen -sinnvolle Kapitänsskills -Pro und Kontra
  10. Die German Ghost Division sucht in WoWS Aktive Kameraden um gemeinsam die Ozeane unsicher zu machen! Uns liegt mehr daran zusammen zu fahren und den Gegner in Angst und Schrecken zu versetzen !!WIR suchen Kameraden für Clan-Gefechte!! ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- WIR Rekrutieren wieder! = Was Wir Euch bieten = - Eigener Discord Server - Kameradschaft - Tipps & Tricks = Was Wir verlangen = - Ein T-8er Schiff (nur für Die Leute Pflicht, die bei CW mit fahren möchten) - Aktivität, auch auf Discord (Pflicht) - Du bist 16 Jahre + - Du Besitzt ein Funktionstüchtiges Headset - Vernünftiger und respektvoller Umgang mit den Kameraden - Teamplay & Kommunikation Bei Interesse melde Dich noch heute bei der German Ghost Division per InGame Nachricht bei folgende Ansprechpartnern... ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Führungsebene GER_GrimReaper Todbrot Anwerber - Rekrutierungsoffizier Fieldmarshal93 EnderDestruktion ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- WIR suchen Dich!
  11. until
    On this day in history in 1945, the Japanese submarine I-58 hit heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis with a torpedo. Ship sunk 12 minutes later and her disappearance was not noticed until a patrol plane chanced to spot the survivors on August 2nd. This failure was caused both by lapses in the coordination between two commands and by a secret nature of the previous journey of the Indianapolis - carrying parts of the first nuclear bombs to the Mariana islands. This was the last large ship being lost during the World War II. Note: Time of the event is set to the actual time of attack, July 30 at 00:15 local time. I-58 USS Indianapolis, July 10th, 1945
  12. Tuccy

    Battle of Savo Island

    until
    This night battle, first of the surface engagement in the Solomons chain, was the worst defeat the US Navy suffered in its history. Reacting to the Allied landing on Guadalcanal, Admiral Mikawa put together all available surface forces - seven cruisers and a single destroyer - and led them in first of the raids down the "Slot" from Rabaul to Guadalcanal. Thanks to the superior night trainign and equipment, along with serious tactical and communication errors on the Allied side, the Japanese force managed to utterly surprise and defeat two of the three Allied surface groups, heavily damaging cruisers USS Chicago and HMAS Canberra (had to be scuttled later) of the Southern patrol group and sinking trio of Astoria class heavy cruisers in the Northern group. USS Quincy under fire Due to the time it took to get his ships back in formation and damage suffered by sporadic return fire, he decided not to risk his ships by pressing the attack further and instead retreated to Rabaul, losing the cruiser Kako to submarine torpedo on August 10th just 70 miles short of Rabaul. In total, with air and submarine attacks, the Japanese lost one heavy cruiser against four heavy cruisers and one destroyer being sunlk on the Allied side. Moreover the attack did lead to decision to withdhraw cargo ships from Guadalcanal, leaving the Marines ashore with limited supplies and equipment. After losing three ships of Astoria class including the lead ship in one battle, the class was renamed after the second ship, USS New Orleans. 8th Fleet (VAdm Gunichi Mikawa) Chokai (flagship) - light damage Cruiser Division 6 (RAdm Goto) Aoba (flagship) Furutaka Kako - torpedoed on August 10th Kinugasa Cruiser Division 18 (RAdm Matsuyama) Tenryu (flagship) Yubari Screen Yunagi Task Force 62 (RAdm Turner) Task Group 62.6 - Western Screen (RAdm Crutchley) HMAS Australia (flagship) - part of Southern Group, not present) Radar Pickets USS Blue USS Ralph Talbot - damaged Southern Group HMAS Canberra - damaged, scuttled USS Chicago - damaged USS Bagley USS Patterson - damaged Northern Group USS Vincennes - sunk USS Quincy - sunk USS Astoria - sunlk USS Helm USS Wilson Task Group 62.4 - Eastern Screen (RAdm Scott) USS San Juan HMAS Hobart USS Monssen USS Buchanan Unattached USS Jarvis - damaged by air strike on August 8th, retreating independently to Australia, sunk by air strike on August 9th
  13. Tuccy

    Sinking of PT-109

    On August 1st, 1943, a strong force of PT boats was dispatched to the Blackett Strait to try and ambush Japanese destroyers bringing supplies to Kolombangara. After unsuccessful attack, only three boats were left on patrol. At 2 at night, August 2nd, one of them, a PT-109, suddenly found itself in the path of destroyer Amagiri. Amagiri rammed and sunk her, leaving 11 survivors in the water. The survivors swam to the nearby islands. Six days later, native scouts found them and, having delivered the boat's commander to an Australian coastwatcher (screatched in the coconut shell), a rescue operation was mounted. Who was the commander of PT-109? None other than the son of former ambassador to the United Kingdom and a future president of the United States, John Fitzgerald Kennedy.
  14. Tuccy

    Battle of Vella Gulf

    until
    This battle saw the first independent operation of US Destroyers in the Solomons while trying to interrupt the "Tokio Express" supply runs. Using the lessons from the previous night battles, Cdr. Moosbugger split his force into two divisions, planning to use DesDiv 12 as a hammer and DesDiv 15 as an anvil in a combined gun and torpedo ambush. Thanks to the new SG radars, the American destroyers of DesDiv 12 were able to launch their torpedoes undetected and their salvo hit all four Japanese destroyers, crippling three of them right under the guns of DesDiv 15. The only Japanese destroyer to escape the ambush was Shigure, where torpedo hitting her punched straight through the rudder without detonating. Shigure was able to get away, adding to her commander, Tameichi Hara's, "Unsinkable" reputation. Note: In the Order of Battle, intentionally displaying the detailed Japanese organization - by this stage of war, where US Navy preferred to deploy Destroyer Divisions together, IJN tended to mix and match ships and commanders who did not operate together before. Task Group 31.2 (Cdr. Moosbrugger) Destroyer Division 12 USS Dunlap (flagship) USS Craven USS Maury Destroyer Division 15 USS Lang USS Sterett USS Stack (Cpt. Kaju Sugiura) 3rd Fleet Destroyer Squadron 10 Destroyer Division 4 Hagikaze (Flagship) - sunk Arashi - sunk 2nd Fleet Destroyer Squadron 2 Destroyer Division 24 Kawakaze - sunk Destroyer Division 27 Shigure - damaged
  15. Tuccy

    Battle of Kolobangara

    until
    Submitted by @Jellicoe1916 In another pitched battle in the Kula Gulf, another edition of "Tokio Express" - 4 transport destroyers escorted by 5 destroyers and a light cruiser - was intercepted by Allied light cruisers. Same as in the previous battle, however, the Japanese ships were shown to be a dangerous opponent. While outnumbered, outgunned and losing the light cruiser Jintsu, their torpedoes found the nmark, heavily damaging all three cruisers and sinking destroyer USS Gwin - while at the same time providing enough distraction for the transport group to land the 1,200 men at Vila. USS St. Louis and HMNZS Leander firing. Japan: Covering Force (RAdm Shunji Izaki) Jintsu (flagship) - sunk Kiyonami Yugure Yukikaze Hamakaze Mikazuki Transport Force (1,200 soldiers for Vila) Satsuki Minazuki Matsukaze Yunagi Allies: Task Force 36.1 (RAdm Ainsworth) Cruiser Division 9 USS Honolulu (CL-48, flagship) - damaged USS St. Louis (CL-49) - damaged HMNZS Leander - damaged Destroyer Squadron 21 USS Nicholas (DD-449) USS O'Bannon (DD-450) USS Taylor (DD-468) USS Jenkins (DD-447) USS Radford (DD-446) Destroyer Squadron 12 USS Ralph Talbot (DD-390) USS Buchanan (DD-484) USS Maury (DD-401) USS Woodworth (DD-460) USS Gwin (DD-433) - sunk
  16. Tuccy

    Battle of Sagami Bay

    until
    On this day in history the last surface action of World War II took place off the tip of the Bōsō Peninsula. Destroyer Squadron 61 of the US Navy intercepted a Japanese coastal convoy of two freighters, escorted by one minesweeper and one submarine chaser. One of the freighters was sunk and the other damaged. Destroyer Squadron 61 Destroyer Division 121 USS De Haven (DD 727) - flagship USS Mansfield (DD 728) USS Lyman K. Swenson (DD 729) USS Collett (DD 730) USS Maddox (DD 731) Destroyer Division 122 USS Blue (DD 744) USS Brush (DD 745) USS Taussig (DD 746) USS Samuel N. Moore (DD 747) USS De Haven (DD 727), flagship of DesRon 61, on May 14th, 1944.
  17. Tuccy

    Attack on Kure

    until
    Following the attack on Yokosuka, the carrier aviation focused on the port of Kure where the bulk of Japanese Navy surviving warships sheltered. In a series of attacks spanning several days, most of the heavy units including aircraft carriers Amagi and Katsuragi, Combined Fleet's flagship cruiser Oyodo, battleships Ise, Hyuga and Haruna, cruisers Tone and Aoba and a number of other ships were sunk, ensuring almost complete freedom of operation for the Allied fleet. The success however came at a steep price of 133 aircrafts - one of the heaviest losses the US Navy 3rd Fleet suffered.
  18. Tuccy

    Attack on Yokosuka

    On this day in history in 1945, Allied naval aviation attacked Yokosuka. While the attack caused considerable damage, the main prize - the battleship Nagato - survived.
  19. Tuccy

    Second Bombardment of Kamaishi

    until
    the last of the bombardments of Japan was truly international, with the American ships being joined not only by British, but also New Zealand warships. The target were again iron works around Kamaishi and the damage caused was more serious than i the first bombardment. Another attack was planned for August 13th, but it was cancelled both due to technical trouble of HMS King George V and the dropping of nuclear bombs. No further bombardment took place until the end of the war. US Navy: USS South Dakota USS Indiana USS Massachusetts USS Quincy II USS Chicago II USS Boston USS Saint Paul nine destroyers Royal Navy: HMS Newfoundland three destroyers (HMS Terpsichore, Termagant, Tenacious) Royal New Zealand Navy: HMNZS Gambia
  20. Tuccy

    Bombardment of Hitachi

    until
    After the British Pacific Fleet joined US Navy off the coast of Japan, British ships joined in the series of coastal bombardments in a night attack on targets around Hitachi. Despite considerable firepower limited visibility lead to less damage inflicted than expected. USA: USS Iowa USS Missouri USS Wisconsin USS North Carolina USS Alabama USS Atlanta II USS Dayton eight destroyers Alabama Royal Navy: HMS King George V two destroyers
  21. Tuccy

    First Bombardment of Kamaishi

    On this day in history in 1945 the series of bombardment and air raids against Japanese coastal targets started. In the first of the series of bombardments, battleships South Dakota, Indiana and Massachusetts, heavy cruisers Quincy II and Chicago II and nine destroyers shelled iron works at Kamaishi (Northern Honshu) while carrier aircraft attacked shipping around Hokkaido and Honshu. This bombardment started a series of other attacks spanning the end of July and beginning of August: July 14th: Iron Works at Kamaichi (USS South Dakota, Indiana, Massachusetts, two cruisers, nine destroyers) July 15th: Iron works at Muroran (USS Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, two cruisers, eight destroyers) July 17/18th: Various targets around Hitachi (USS Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Alabama, HMS King George V, two cruisers, eight American and two British destroyers) July 18th: Cape Nojima radar station (cruisers USS Astoria II, Pasadena, Springfield, Wilkes-Barre, six destroyers) - no damage July 24/25th: Seaplane base at Kushimoto and airfield near Cape Shionomisaki (same ships, little damage) July 29th: Various targets around Hamamatsu (USS South Dakota, Indiana, Massachusett, two cruisers, nine destroyers for USN; HMS King George V, three destroyers for the Royal Navy) July 30th/31st: Shimizu aluminum plant (Destroyer Squadron 25) August 9th - 10th: Second bombardment of Kamaishi (USS South Dakota, Indiana, Massachusett, four cruisers, nine destroyers for USN, one cruiser and three destroyers for Royal Navy, one cruiser for New Zealand) USS Indiana shelling Kamaishi, July 14th 1945.
  22. Tuccy

    Trinity Test

    until
    Submitted by @whiskey_sk On this day in 1945, the USA tested "the Gadget" - the first functional nuclear bomb on a test site in New Mexico. The test site before explosion. Fireball 16 milliseconds after explosion. Mushroom cloud forming at Trinity site.
  23. Tuccy

    Battle for Saipan Ends

    Submitted by @whiskey_sk On this day in history in 1944 the island of Saipan was proclaimed secured by the US forces commander, Admiral Turner. Despite that, scattered groups of Japanese soldiers were still in hiding, including the last organized fighting unit of the Japanese army under Cpt. Sakae Ōba (he surrendered on December 1st, 1945). Cpt. Oba
  24. Tuccy

    Battle of Kula Gulf

    As the Allies advanced through the Solomons island chain, a pattern evolved - US troops landed on a new island, Japanese destroyers - the infamous "Tokyo Express" - were redirected to new port to ship supplies and reinforcements. Exactly this happened on the night of 6 July, 1943, when a group of American cruisers and destroyers intercepted a convoy of 10 destroyers. The confused night battle did see sinking of two Japanese destroyers, while USS Helena fell victim to torpedoes after she expended all her flashless powder supplies and in turn was the most visible. USS Helena and USS St. Louis in action. Cover Force (Radm Akiyama Terou) Niizuki (Flagship) - sunk Suzukaze - damaged Tanikaze 1st Transport Group Mochizuki - damaged Mikazuki Hamakaze 2nd Transport Group Nagatsuki - damaged, beached, later destroyed by air raid Satsuki Amagiri - damaged Hatsuyuki - damaged Task Group 36.1 (RAdm Ainsworth) Cruiser Division 9 USS Honolulu (CL-48) (Flagship) USS St. Louis (CL-49) USS Helena (CL-50) - sunk Destroyer Squadron 21 USS Nicholas (DD-449) USS Radford (DD-446) USS O'Bannon (DD-450) USS Jenkins (DD-447)
  25. Tuccy

    Action of 5 July

    On this day in history in 1942, submarine USS Growler managed to find three Japanese destroyers at anchor off the recently occupied island of Kiska. Firing one of the most devastating torpedo spreads in the submarine warfare history, her six torpedoes resulted in at least three hits, one on each of the destroyers. The Asashio class Arare exploded and sunk, remaining two destroyers managed to get back home with serious damage. USS Growler Shiranui (Kagero class) - damaged Arare (Asashio class) - sunk Kasumi (Asashio class) - damaged
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