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Chainsaw_Ecosse

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About Chainsaw_Ecosse

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  1. Chainsaw_Ecosse

    USS Yorktown CV-10 - real life tour

    Last one!!! Stern view Another bofors mount on shore, note the shell ejection chutes in red OK I guess you'll have had enough by now! Thanks if you've read this far, may have another coming up in a month or two... Cheers, Alan
  2. Chainsaw_Ecosse

    USS Yorktown CV-10 - real life tour

    And the Iowa Right enough models for now, this was a flooding station to try and stabilize the trim of the ship if damaged etc Back to shipmodels again and we're in the cruiser section USS Baltimore T9 Right, forwards to the bow section. These guys are the pressure vessels for the steam catapults, basically all held up here under fairly significant pressure then piped out to catapult rams to launch the post war planes. this is one of the rams, uses pulleys and cables attached to the bogey on deck Hangerdeck view again The hatched area is warning of the blast doors which come across when rearming planes etc so that if there is an accident or they are hit, the explosion is contained. 40mm Bofors mount
  3. Chainsaw_Ecosse

    USS Yorktown CV-10 - real life tour

    This was cool to look through Imagine trying to figure that out when under attack!! As the Yorktown was involved in the attack on the yamato, needless to say there was a big section on that. This was a helluva model!! Some 16" shells and the canvas powder bags, would make good occasional seating for the WG offices!! Tennessee class, fits between the T6 New Mexico and T7 Colorado actually very very similar to the New Mexico class, slightly better anti torp armour. USS Arizona, sunk at Pearl Harbour (not in game but probably slots in just after the South Carolina) insert3765 USS Washington, sister ship of the North Carolina South Dakota class, again not in game but after North Carolina and before Iowa
  4. Chainsaw_Ecosse

    USS Yorktown CV-10 - real life tour

    And dotted about were some quite rare gun mounts. This was a 1.1" quad AA mount. These were rushed into the US navy in early WW2, after airpower came to the fore in naval warfare, you see them modelled quite a lot in WoWS. It was pulled in to try and bridge the gap between MGs and the 5" DP mounts. It was kinda too small for the role and the gap was eventually bridged with the 20mm Oerlikon and 40mm Bofors of the later period. To quote a reliable source on wikipedia; Some more cool model, this is of the WW2 Yorktown Up onto the flight deck now, some of the arrestor hook terminals (and an F14 and A4) Looking back towards the island, with arrestor cable From the bow And in the island, the escalator.. Now I thought this was for the tourists but apparently it was because the more modern pilots with all their gear couldn't get through all the hatches and ladders etc to get to their aircraft so this was installed... Below decks was room after room of interesting stuff, info on escort carriers This was the bomblift showing where the hatch was removed and welded over. It shows the armour thickness here, the floor of the hanger, about 2 inches.
  5. Chainsaw_Ecosse

    USS Yorktown CV-10 - real life tour

    Hi All, This one is a little late, I visited her while seeing USS Laffey but as I had USS Hornet already done I thought she could wait and then I forgot about her.. Patriots Point in South Carolina is a cool place to visit if you ever get the chance, there are 2 warships, Laffey and Yorktown, 1 sub, the Clagamore and a Vietnam war exhibit and all for $20! Well worth the money and a good way to kill pretty much a full day if you take your time. I had a 4 hour drive each way so I had to do it in about 4 hours and felt a little rushed. The entry gates are to the right of me here and it's an impressive walk out to the Yorktown. You can see the stern of the Laffey on the left. As with USS Hornet, the Yorktown was upgraded so her silhouette isn't the same as the in game Essex class. The Yorktown started off life as the Bon Homme Richard but after the previous USS Yorktown, CV-5, was sunk at Midway they decided to rename her before launch. She was briefly decommisioned in the early 50's before being modernized just after Korean War and serving through the Vietnam War. She was apparently used in Tora Tora Tora, a Pearl Harbour movie. As with most American ships she saw extensive action in the Pacific supporting the US forces as they island hopped towards Japan culminating in participating in the sinking of the Yamato claiming several torpedo hits. I don't find carriers as interesting as other warships but because they are so big they tend to jam packed with interesting stuff. Starting off with the flightdeck, A Douglas SBD Dauntless dive bomber showing it's dive brakes An F4F Wildcat fighter and a Grumman TBF Avenger torpedo bomber There was also a bunch of other aircraft in the hanger deck, this F4U corsair, great plane but not grest for carrier use so the Marines picked them up. There was a good section on Japanese carriers, a lot of good info there, list of all the carriers and what happened to them... only 4 survived! Some detail on the Shinano japanese CV, based on the Yamato hull! This might be the Soryu, can't recall and on to part 2 (sorry but the forum limits the number of piccies per post)
  6. Chainsaw_Ecosse

    USS Laffey - DD-724 Real Life Tour

    'fraid not sir, there were a few areas out of bounds and engine rooms tend to be them. You can maybe see a few pics of the boilers and steam turbines here but they may not be the WWII ones, it's unclear if they were replaced during the FRAM upgrade (I suspect not) Cheers, Alan
  7. Chainsaw_Ecosse

    USS Laffey - DD-724 Real Life Tour

    Now a bit about the turrets and ammo feeds. As with almost all warships of this era, they had learned that having all the rounds and powder stored near the gun was just asking for trouble so the ammo was stored in an armoured citadel way way below decks. Some ammos was stored in a ready area in order to be able to keep the gun fed as these things could fire faster than they could be resupplied so enough rounds were keep locally to provide a burst of rapid fire when needed. Usually the guns weren't firing flat out for sustained periods of time so the ready ammo could be replenished during any lulls in gun action. The starboard gun of a twin turret is shown here You can see a projectile in the hoist, these are jacked up from the handling room below the turret. The round pipe on the floor is where the powderman pulls the powder from, he removes it from the powder houst by his knee and places it into the rammer tray, the projectile man hauls the round out of the hoist and drops it in front of the powder charge in the tray then pull the lever you can see point down and back at the breech. This rams the charge and projectile into the breech ready to fire. This then gets repeated as fast as possible. this is the ready room under the turret. Ammo gets fed in here and take directly up into the turret via the hoist you can see here. You can see the armour thickness here. Not bad but not hugely thick either On the deck below the ready room, you can see the hoist channel as it passes through from the magazine below I never did get to see the magazine on this guy. At the beginning of August 1944 USS Laffey set sail again for the Pacific theatre. From the US East coast she transited the Panama Canal heading for Pearl Harbour, Hawaii. She was involved in operation in the Philippines, Leyte Gulf and bombarding shore batteries to cover island landings before being assigned to support the invasion of Okinawa. You can see in the turret photo above the date and time April 16th 0830 of the attack. She was on radar picket duty about 50km north of Okinawa when the Japanese launched an attack with about 50 aircraft. 4 aircraft, Vals headed right for her, and started their Kamikaze run, two were shot down and 2 missed. A couple of Judys came in on bombing an strafing runs and were dispatched with by the 5" DP guns but not before a glancing bomb hit. She was eventually attacked by in excess of 20 aircraft, bombing, strafing and suiciding into her. During the onslaught some Combat Air Patrol aircraft were stationed over here to help protect her, one of them following an Oscar in peppering it with .50 cal bullets and forcing her to miss the bridge, clip the mast and splash into the sea, unfortunately the Corsair pilot also clipped the mast and crashed into the sea. 20mm and 40mm gun crew were hit by bomb fragments and burning fuel from the kamikaze attacks, the rear 5" turret was completely destroyed by 2 more kamikaze attacks a few minutes apart. After this ferocious eighty minute attack the Laffey was a wreck, burning, jammed rudder, radar damage and most of her guns out of actionbut doggedly still afloat. She had been hit but 5 bomb laden kamikaze planes, 4 bombs had hit and she was grazed by kamikazes another 4 times. Battleships have been sunk by less truly the ship that would not die. This photo shows the attack runs and results, talk about surrounded! All the crew in the rear 5" turret were tragically killed, they were probably so busy serving their gun that the 2 kamikazes that hit the rear turret were probably not spotted by the gun crew who would be glued to their viewfinders. You can see some of the damage here, pretty messed up! Still afloat, she was taken under tow to Okinawa quickly repaired to get her seaworthy again and she sailed to the US west coast landing at Tacoma WA for repairs which kept her there until September. For her part in the action she received a Presidetial Unit Citation but that was about it for the ship the would not die she participated in the atomic bombs test in Bikini Atoll being decommisioned at the end of June 1947 and being placed into reserve. She was reactivated for the Korean War, upgraded in 1962 and remained on duty until March 9th 1975, she was the last Sumner class destroyer to be decommissioned and is the last Sumner class DD left today, still not dead!! Apologies blethering on (talking) so much and for the mulipart posting, the forum SW doesn't allow too many images per post. Maybe a bit on USS Yorktown later in the week.
  8. Chainsaw_Ecosse

    USS Laffey - DD-724 Real Life Tour

    back on deck midships, where the front torp launcher used to be before modernization, there is a pair of more modern triple mk32 Anti Sub (ASW) torp launchers. and also a 5 inch training mount so the crew can practice reloading the gun. The foot pedals are for getting a projectile out from the ammo feed. You can also see the channel for the powder and projectile and the rammer, the pad at the rear which pushes the powder and projectile into the breech. Motor for this is above. These actually appear on the DD models in game. Good work WG! A view of the DASH, this was a drone which delivered a couple of ASW torps. It extended the ASW capability beyond the ship launched torps and had a pretty decent range, 35km allowing you to sneak an attack on a submarine who wouldn't know you were in range until they heard the high speed screws in the water. Loads more info on this but not really relevant so... Bridge shot, this was the (lightly) armoured section, you can see the outer bit through the portholes Shot of the 5 inch rangefinder with kill card, yep they claimed 2 german pillboxes and 4 islands Bombardments. view of the inside of the range finder you can just about make out the eyepieces. I think I explained how these worked in the USS North Carolina post. rear view Now to turrets and guns!
  9. Chainsaw_Ecosse

    USS Laffey - DD-724 Real Life Tour

    One interesting thing about the Sumner class ships was that they were one of the first US DDs to have an internal passageway. A minor thing but in rough seas when getting from the bow to the stern sailors were sometimes lost at sea in rough weather. The Sumner class were also one of the first DDs to have a Combat Information Centre (CIC) rather than being fought from the bridge. View of the internal corridor the galley, I assume the addition of a pizza over was a post war thing lol Fire control room, complete with the 'Computer Mark 1' A vice on deck, starboard side, surely the US makes vices...? Hatch with coaming to keep the water out. This was on the starboard side, bow to the right of the photo so any water coming down the deck wouldn't cascade below. I like wee details like this, wonder if WG have modelled them...? Down into the engine room originally fitted with 4 boilers and 2 steam turbines. It was hot a heck down here and that was with no boiler running! Main panel looking to the right and rear of the panel to the port side of the ship towards the rear. You can see the side of the ship start to turn under as it head towards the keel. looking down into the bilges! This is the generator room where the electrical power that drives everything from turret drives, radar, lights and magazine feeds, a hit in here was what knocked out the USS Atlanta. A possible new critical hit location?? Let's get back on deck
  10. Chainsaw_Ecosse

    USS Laffey - DD-724 Real Life Tour

    Hi All, Thought I'd throw up another one of these up. I've done a couple of these Real Life Tours, one for the USS North Carolina (north carolina class BB) and one for USS Hornet (Essex Class CV) This one is for something a little smaller, USS Laffey which was a late war Allen M Sumner class DD. It's currently based at Patriots Point, Mount Pleasant in South Carolina along with USS Yorktown, another Essex Class CV and USS Clagamore, one of the numerous Balao class submarines, (120 boats!) from WW2. All of them were upgraded after the war so have some differences to the guys you may see in game. The Americans had an annoying habit of naming their ships after ones that had just sunk, ostensibly to honour the previous ship but I wonder if it was to confuse the heck out of the Japanese.... "USS Laffey, I though we had sunk that one....?!" The previous USS Laffey was DD-459 and she was a Benson Class DD who appears in the US line at Tier 8. DD-459 was laid down in 1941 and was lost just over a year later in 1942, so John Steinbecks quote, "wherever there is a mess, the destroyer runs first. she is expendable and dangerous." certainly applied in this case! This is DD=459 DD-459 Went down fighting, and fighting hard at the naval battle of Guadalcanal earning a Presidential Unit Citation. 8 US destroyers and 5 cruisers came into contact with a Japanese force of 2 Kongo class BBs, 1 CL (Nagara class, very similar to Kuma's) and 14 DDs. The action took place at 0124 in the morning with the two forces almost bumping into each other despite confirmed radar contact. The deployment was very confused and the initial engagement took place at a range of only 2.7km! One of the officers described it as a "a barroom brawl after the lights had been shot out" USS Atlanta, the tier 7 premium should have been in her element but because she was the lead ship took a pasting early on in the battle and was combat ineffective very quickly. Meanwhile USS Laffey DD459 in the darkness and confusion pass within 20 feet of Admiral Abe's Kongo class Hiei hit her with a couple of torps and rippled the heck out of the superstructure and bridge with 5" gun fire and badly wounded Admiral Abe impacting his ability to direct the battle. The Hiei's primary and secondary guns couldn't hit DD-459 as they couldn't depress their guns far enough, face hugging a BB!! DD-459 was in trouble though, with a BB behind her, another one on her port side and two japanese DDs in front, it was not going to end well. A 14" shell from the Hiei and a torp in the butt put her out of action. The captain ordered the crew to abandon ship but fire reached her magazine and a massive explosion tore her apart with a heavy loss of life. That was the first USS Laffey, this one, DD-724 is an Allen M Sumner Class DD and doesn't appear in the US DD tech tree. A class of 58 ships the Sumner class was later extended by just over 4 metres and became the tier X Gearing class DDs we see in game. There is very little difference between the Gearing and the Sumner class ships, the extra length in the Gearings was used mainly for fuel to give a longer range than the Sumner class ships. Armament was the same although the Gearings were a little faster. The USS Laffey was launched in on 24th November 1943 and commissioned on the 8th of February 1944. As she is still around today and earned the nickname "the ship that would not die" thankfully her life would not be as short as her predecessor. After some training voyages she eventually set sail for Europe part of a convoy escort refueling at Greenock Scotland before arriving on the south coast of England on the 27th May 1944... She was off Utah Beach on escort and shore bombardment duties on June 6th 1944, successfully knocking out some pillboxes and beating off a German Eboat attack. She popped back over to Plymouth to refuel and re-arm and then resumed her shore bombardment duties off Cherbourg, France. Several allied ship were hit by the German shore batteries and a 9" shell skipped off the water and rather than overpenetrating simply went into the bow section and just lay there.... It was carefully maneuvered to the side of the ship and tossed overboard. A close one! USS Laffey then returned to the US to prepare for a trip to the Pacific! This is the USS Laffey DD-724 in it's wartime configuration, 3 twin 5" turrets which were used in various mods on every US class of ship from destroyers, cruisers, battleships and even CVs. The main difference between this and the current version is the removal of a lot of AA and the torp launchers which were replaced with more modern torp launchers and a Drone, Anti Submarine Helicopter (DASH) hanger and flight deck as shown here. You approach the USS Laffey via a long jetty with the impressive USS Yorktown behind. Rear quarter view which shows the rear twin 5" turret which we'll hear some more about later. Close up Some external glamour shots! Starboard bow Bow midships aft Now let's head below decks!
  11. Flag question, specifically the one where there is zero chance of a magazine explosion. I'm sure I got one-shotted and in the messages after I got hit it said, critical magazine damage. Is the flag supposed to prevent this? I thought it had happened before so I put auto resupply on to ensure I had the flag when fighting. Sorry no replay. Cheers, Alan
  12. Chainsaw_Ecosse

    Public test 0.4.0 Other changes

    Got a couple for you, one here. The map is a bit weird when you click M but only for an instant. This never happened on my machine with the previous version. See weird green effect round islands.. then it goes away HTH Alan
  13. Chainsaw_Ecosse

    Minor Bugs --- Collection Thread

    Tiny one from me, see screenshot, shipname, wrong argument, top left corner, nor sure on SIGNALS nul/null thing either Cheers, Alan
  14. Chainsaw_Ecosse

    USS Hornet CV-12 - real life tour

    Heading below decks we went into the forecastle where the anchor and associated machinery was. Interesting to see how this all worked, lots of noise and if you got in the way of this thing when it was paying out, there would not have been much left of you. There was a display in this space showing some damage she took. She was caught in a typhoon and the force was such that it damaged the flight deck force the aircraft to launch off the back as she steamed backwards into the wind There were a few interesting areas below decks including the marine detachment, the various medical facilities and the torpedo maintenance and arming area. This was set up similarly to a battleship turret with the bits that go bang stowed below and only brought up when required. This was looking down under the floor of the torp room, the floor hatch opened up and the torps were winched up to be worked on. The torp room looked like this, not much room to work. Note the black and yellow 'I' beams which carried the winch and allowed you to move the torps around and the hatches, one open and one closed to access below. You can see the I beams going through into the crew bunkspace. The bunks were cleared away and they used this space for storing torps as they got them ready prior to a battle. They were then taken up in this lift, through the 'citadel' wall into the hanger deck Well that's about all the interesting bits, never got to see the engine room but hopefully this gives you an idea of how some of the stuff really worked when you are playing WoWS. Cheers, Alan
  15. Chainsaw_Ecosse

    USS Hornet CV-12 - real life tour

    I then headed up to the flight deck to catch an island tour... yes they put in an escalator (for tourist purposes...) On the flight deck things are a little different from the WW2 config. Less arrestor cables, the refit left only 4 cables whereas the WW2 config had something like 8 or so although the barricade used to catch the aircraft if they didn't hook on remains pretty much the same. You can see one of the cable pulleys here and also the arm for the barricade The island, with the bow to the left. Rear radome and behind that the Primary Flight control which looked after the aircraft landing from the rear. one of the remaining and modernized 5in gun mounts Flight deck looking aft towards San Francisco one of the portside 5in mounts In the island we had a tour of the main areas, this is the flight boss' position in 'PriFly' aka Primary Flight control. and his view you can see the 4 pair of arrestor cable pulleys and the barricade hydraulic arm (only 1 is raised)
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