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AcE_CSFFCSK

Alpha Tester
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About AcE_CSFFCSK

  • Rank
    Able Seaman
  • Birthday 12/24/1980
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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Hungary
  1. AcE_CSFFCSK

    KMS Graf Zeppelin

    As you can see my quote, similar to the RN. In structure, not in numbers. As I mentioned two different ways were developed: plan z and the large number of sub. They started the plan z in 1939 january. When the war started at 1939.09.01. they stopped the plan z and started the sub plan. The plan z had reason to start, becuse they know, don't have any chance against the RN in direct confrontation. So they planned to build a fleet against trading ships. H class ship were mostly against the trade convoys and second part of their task were the BB section of the RN.
  2. AcE_CSFFCSK

    KMS Graf Zeppelin

    As you can see, I wrote similar, not the same. I know they had resource problems, but if you think about that, they have enough time, then they had enought time to get resourced too. Trading was the key factor of the whole war. In this case, they had resources from Sweden (metal). I know this is only fiction. Just think about the date 1946. The war has ended, before they wanted to start it. Their industrial capacity were limited, but they managed to build a lots of planes, tanks, and if they had enough time, than ships too.
  3. AcE_CSFFCSK

    KMS Graf Zeppelin

    The fact is that in the Z plan they tried to make a similar fleet like the Royal Navy. They researched in the early 1930's, which concept will be acceptable to get KM into better position against RN . They had two option: -Plan Z, 800 units similar to Royal Navy: main force of the plan z: 13 BB 4 CV 15 CA (Panzerschiffe-class) 23 cruiser 22 "Spâhkreuzer" - The other plan based on submarines First of all they don't had concept, because they planned the war to the late 40's (1946-47?), with a similar fleet like RN had.
  4. AcE_CSFFCSK

    KMS Graf Zeppelin

    The KM had a plan for building the fleet. Everyone knows, it is the plan z. They were expecting the start of the war at the late 40's. If they had enough time for build the units and make the trainings, I think then they had a good chance to cut UK from supply. First of all the problem with the carriers was in every navy over the world, to how to use them. The IJN had only the doctrine cause of a navy restriction contract, to use them as an independent strike force. The USN, RN had the same problem, how to use carriers. The old fashioned captains see in CV a good fireing coordinator and fire correction system. Some of them said, no need CV-s, they had to build more BB-s. In this situation the hesitation of the KM wasn't adjective.
  5. AcE_CSFFCSK

    KMS Graf Zeppelin

    I share you opinion that in 1943 the Graf Zeppelin become a useless for KM. At the start of the war with the pocket battleships together as a battlegroup, I think it become a usefull CV for KM. A battlegroup have more chance to operate effective against any unit. Just like for an example against a BB group.
  6. AcE_CSFFCSK

    KMS Graf Zeppelin

    "I disagree with that part, they don't had enoguh resource to finish and maintain the carrier."
  7. AcE_CSFFCSK

    German Battleship Tirpitz

    [OFF]As I know in the last Rambo film a tallboy explodes by the claymore, that john rambo planted with a wire.[/OFF] As I know the disassemble of the whole ship was ten years from the fjord. The Norwegian goverment had to disassemble the whole ship cause it was in a shipping way.
  8. AcE_CSFFCSK

    German Battleship Tirpitz

    We can argue about it, but ok. Some bombs hit the Tirpitz and one in the near by. But it is a fact, tallboy bombs taken out the Tirpitz.
  9. AcE_CSFFCSK

    German Battleship Tirpitz

    The No. 617 Squadron RAF used Tallboy bombs against the Tirpitz to sink it. Tallboy bomb is 5,400 kg. Many hit needed to sink the battleship.
  10. AcE_CSFFCSK

    KMS Graf Zeppelin

    I disagree with that part, they don't had enoguh resource to finish and maintain the carrier. As the allies had experience in carrier maintenance, the germans had the same chance to develop their own carrier based operations and maintenance. I think if the graf zeppelin finished, then they had more possibilities. First of all you had to think about the north passage. The SU had then less chance to get support from us and uk. The greatest problem of the Kriegsmarine was, they can't protect their subs from aircrafts and ASW (anti submarine warfare) vessels. If they had an aircraft carrier in the near by, that had more possibilities to protect the submarines from ASW forces, and have much easier to operate against the convoys.
  11. AcE_CSFFCSK

    KMS Graf Zeppelin

    As I know Fw-190D carrier versions were planed to be boarded to the carrier. Two types of them were planed. A torpedo/bomber version, and a fighter version. The Fw-s were much reliable and better for carrier air wing then the Me-109-s. First of all for the gear position is a critical for landing. The Me-109 had a terrible stat for normal air force (Luftwaffe) usage. Many of them destroyed by landing cause of the small fetch between the gears.
  12. AcE_CSFFCSK

    KMS Graf Zeppelin

    I think this is the greatest error of the Kriegsmarine, cause they don't finished the ship. Many possibilities were opened for them after the finishing of the ship. Any suggestions?
  13. AcE_CSFFCSK

    KMS Graf Zeppelin

    Thanks for the mention. Error corrected.
  14. AcE_CSFFCSK

    KMS Graf Zeppelin

    KMS Graf Zeppelin Dry data: Displacement: 34,090tLength: 262.5 m (861 ft 3 in)Beam: 36.2 m (118 ft 9 in)Draft: 8.5 m (27 ft 11 in)Installed power: 200,000 shaft horsepower (150,000 kW)Propulsion: 4 geared turbinesSpeed: 33.8 kn (62.6 km/h)Range: 8,000 km (4,300 nmi) at 19 kn (35 km/h)Complement: 1,720Armament: 16 × 15 cm SK C/28 guns12 × 10.5 cm SK C/33 guns22 × 3.7 cm SK C/30 guns28 × 2 cm FlaK gunsArmor: Belt: 100 mm (3.9 in)Flight deck: 45 mm (1.8 in)Main deck: 60 mm (2.4 in)Aircraft carried: Proposed complement of 421930 proposal: 30 fighters & 12 dive bombers1939 proposal: 12 fighters & 30 dive bombers Work started in 1936 on Flugzeugträger A, which was the Kriegsmarine's first aircraft carrier. Her keel was laid down on 28 December that year, at the Deutsche Werke shipyard in Kiel. She was launched on 8 December 1938, and by the end of 1939, she was 85% complete, with a projected completion by the middle of 1940. By September 1939, one carrier-borne wing, Trägergruppe 186, had been formed by the Luftwaffe at Kiel Holtenau, composed of three squadrons equipped with Bf 109s and Ju-87s. World War 2 "appearance": Meanwhile, the German conquest of Norway in April 1940 further eroded any chance of completing Flugzeugträger A (now named Graf Zeppelin). Now responsible for defending Norway's long coastline and numerous port facilities, the Kriegsmarine urgently needed large numbers of coastal guns and anti-aircraft batteries. During a naval conference with Hitler on 29 April 1940, Admiral Erich Raeder proposed halting all work on Graf Zeppelin, arguing that even if she was commissioned by the end of 1940, final installation of her guns would need another ten months or more (her original fire control system had been sold to the Soviet Union under an earlier trade agreement). Hitler consented to the stop work order, allowing Raeder to have Graf Zeppelin's 15 cm guns removed and transferred to Norway. The carrier's heavy flak armament of twelve 10.5 cm guns had already been diverted elsewhere.In July 1940, Graf Zeppelin was towed from Kiel to Gotenhafen (Gdynia) and remained there for nearly a year. While there, she was used as a storage depot for Germany's hardwood supply. Just before Germany invaded the Soviet Union in June 1941, the carrier was again moved, this time to Stettin, to safeguard her from Soviet air attacks. By November, the German army had pushed deep enough into Russian territory to remove any further threat of air attack and Graf Zeppelin was returned to Gotenhafen. In July 1940, Graf Zeppelin was towed from Kiel to Gotenhafen (Gdynia) and remained there for nearly a year. While there, she was used as a storage depot for Germany's hardwood supply. Just before Germany invaded the Soviet Union in June 1941, the carrier was again moved, this time to Stettin, to safeguard her from Soviet air attacks. By November, the German army had pushed deep enough into Russian territory to remove any further threat of air attack and Graf Zeppelin was returned to Gotenhafen. By the time Raeder met with Hitler for a detailed discussion of naval strategy in April 1942, the usefulness of aircraft carriers in modern naval warfare had been amply demonstrated. British carriers had crippled the Italian fleet at Taranto in November 1940, critically damaged the German battleship Bismarck in May 1941 and prevented battleship Tirpitz from attacking two convoys bound for Russia in March 1942. In addition, a Japanese carrier raid on Pearl Harbor had devastated the American battle fleet in December 1941. Raeder, anxious to secure air protection for the Kriegsmarine's heavier surface units, informed Hitler that Graf Zeppelin could be finished in about a year, with another six months required for sea trials and flight training. On 13 May 1942, with Hitler's authorization, the German Naval Supreme Command ordered work resumed on the carrier. But daunting technical problems remained. Raeder wanted newer planes, specifically designed for carrier use. Reichsmarshall Hermann Göring, head of the Luftwaffe, replied that the already overburdened German aircraft industry could not possibly complete the design, testing and mass production of such aircraft before 1946. Instead, he proposed converting existing aircraft (again the Junkers Ju 87 and Messerschmitt Bf 109) as a temporary solution until newer types could be developed. Training of carrier pilots at Travemünde would also resume. On the night of 27–28 August 1942, Graf Zeppelin was the target of the only Allied air attack aimed at the incomplete carrier. Nine Royal Air Force Avro Lancaster heavy bombers from 106 Squadron were dispatched against her, each one carrying a single "Capital Ship" bomb, a 5,500 lb device with a shaped charge warhead intended for armored targets. One pilot was unable to see the carrier due to haze dropped his bomb instead on the estimated position of the German battleship Gneisenau. Another believed he had scored a direct hit on Graf Zeppelin but there is no known record of the ship suffering any damage from a bomb strike that night. Graf Zeppelin in drydock in March 1943On 5 December 1942, Graf Zeppelin was towed back to Kiel and placed in a floating drydock. It seemed she might well see completion after all, but by late January 1943 Hitler had become so disenchanted with the Kriegsmarine, especially with what he perceived as the poor performance of its surface fleet, that he ordered all of its larger ships taken out of service and scrapped. To Raeder, who had often clashed with Hitler on naval policy, this was a stunning setback. In a long memorandum to Hitler he called the new order "the cheapest sea victory England ever won". Raeder was shortly relieved of command and replaced with former Commander of Submarines Karl Dönitz. Though Admiral Dönitz eventually persuaded Hitler to void most of the order, work on all new surface ships and even those nearing completion was halted, including Graf Zeppelin. On 30 January 1943, all major work on the ship ceased, though some limited, temporary work continued until March. In April 1943 Graf Zeppelin was again towed eastward, first to Gotenhafen, then to the roadstead at Swinemünde and finally berthed at a back-water wharf in the Parnitz River, two miles (3 km) from Stettin, where she had been briefly docked in 1941. There she languished for the next two years with only a 40-man custodial crew in attendance. When Red Army forces neared the city in April 1945, the ship's Kingston valves were opened, flooding her lower spaces and settling her firmly into the mud in shallow water. A ten-man engineering squad then rigged the vessel's interior with demolition and depth charges in order to hole the hull and destroy vital machinery. At 6pm on 25 April 1945, just as the Russians entered Stettin, commander Wolfgang Kähler radioed the squad to detonate the explosives. Smoke billowing from the carrier's funnel confirmed the charges had gone off, rendering the ship useless to her new owners for many months to come. After World War 2: The carrier's history and fate after Germany's surrender was unclear for decades after the war. Instead, the Soviets decided to salvage the damaged ship and it was refloated in March 1946. According to German historian Erich Gröner, after the Soviets raised the scuttled ship, they towed her to Leningrad.
  15. AcE_CSFFCSK

    Class Nimitz - USS Nimitz (CVN-68)

    You don't know well. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080736/
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